Cloud Computing

The Cloud

The definition of "The Cloud" varies greatly by service provider, as do the cloud offerings. Digital Planet provides specific, defined answers to cloud solutions, with real world experience in migration planning from legacy services to cloud based technologies.

Cloud services means services made available to users on demand via the Internet from a cloud computing provider's servers as opposed to being provided from a company's own on-premises servers. Cloud services are designed to provide easy, scalable access to applications, resources and services, and are fully managed by a cloud services provider.

A cloud service can dynamically scale to meet the needs of its users, and because the service provider supplies the hardware and software necessary for the service, there’s no need for a company to provision or deploy its own resources or allocate IT staff to manage the service. Examples of cloud services include online data storage and backup solutions, Web-based e-mail services, hosted office suites and document collaboration services, database processing, managed technical support services and more.

Why move to the cloud?

Purchasing and maintaining IT infrastructure is expensive, and IT staff is forced to spend time on management of the infrastructure instead of spending time on strategic company initiatives. Cloud solutions allow IT resources to focus on strategic projects, not existing aging infrastructure. This applies to all aspects of hardware in the corporate environment, not just software and servers, but Telephony equipment as well.

What are the types of cloud?

Cloud Network

Private Cloud – Private cloud is the phrase used to describe a cloud computing platform that is implemented within the corporate firewall, under the control of the IT department. A private cloud is designed to offer the same features and benefits of public cloud systems, but removes a number of objections to the cloud computing model including control over enterprise and customer data, worries about security, and issues connected to regulatory compliance.

Public Cloud – A form of cloud computing in which a company relies on a third-party cloud service provider for services such as servers, data storage and applications, which are delivered to the company through the Internet. A public cloud can free companies from the potentially expensive costs of having to purchase, manage and maintain on-premises hardware and software infrastructure. Public clouds can also typically be deployed much faster and with more scalability and accessibility than on-premises infrastructure as a result of the public cloud provider’s expertise and existing infrastructure. Public cloud subscribers may pay pay-as-you-go fees or fixed monthly fees for the public cloud services they utilize.

Hybrid Cloud – A combined form of private clouds and public clouds in which some critical data resides in the enterprise’s private cloud while other data is stored in and accessible from a public cloud. Hybrid clouds seek to deliver the advantages of scalability, reliability, rapid deployment and potential cost savings of public clouds with the security and increased control and management of private clouds.